imaginative


imaginative
imaginative, imaginal, imaginable, imaginary, though not synonymous, are sometimes confused because of their verbal likeness.
Imaginative applies to something which is the product of the imagination or has a character indicating the exercise or the power of the imagination; thus, imaginative writings are often distinguished from such factual writings as historical, expository, and argumentative; an imaginative poet is one whose imagination heightens his perception of people and things
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it is a common fallacy that a writer . . . can achieve this poignant quality by improving upon his subject matter, by using his "imagination" upon it and twisting it to suit his purpose. The truth is that by such a process (which is not imaginative at all!) he can at best produce only a brilliant sham— Cather

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[workaday scientists] ... are prone to identify the poetical with the impractical, the imaginative with the imaginary, the fictional with the false— Muller

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Imaginal, meaning of the imagination or within the conceptive powers of the imagination, has been used, especially by psychologists, to fill the need for an adjective which refers to the imagination only as a function of the mind rather than as a creative power or to images as the mental representations which follow a sensation; thus, a person belongs to one imaginal type rather than to another because of his tendency to have sensory images of a particular kind (as visual, tactile, or auditory)
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perhaps they owe their imaginal coloration to some childhood experience— Cutsforth

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Imaginable often means little more than conceivable, but more precisely it may imply that the thing so qualified can be seen or apprehended in a clear mental image
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St. Thomas was perhaps of all the apostles the one most easily imaginable in the present— Mackenzie

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Imaginary (for fuller treatment see IMAGINARY 1) implies existence only in the imagination
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imaginary woes

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Imaginary Conversations, a book by Walter Savage Landor giving imaginary dialogues and imaginary letters between famous persons of long ago

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the vague unrest of a husband whose infidelities are imaginaryGlasgow

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Analogous words: imagining, fancying, realizing, conceiving (see THINK): creative, inventive (see corresponding verbs at INVENT)
Contrasted words: *prosaic, prosy, matter-of-fact

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Imaginative — Im*ag i*na*tive, a. [F. imaginatif.] 1. Proceeding from, and characterized by, the imagination, generally in the highest sense of the word. [1913 Webster] In all the higher departments of imaginative art, nature still constitutes an important… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • imaginative — [i maj′i nə tiv, i maj′ināt΄iv] adj. [ME imaginatif < OFr < ML imaginativus] 1. having, using, or showing imagination; having great creative powers 2. given to imagining 3. of or resulting from imagination [imaginative literature]… …   English World dictionary

  • imaginative — index artful, fertile, original (creative), productive, resourceful Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • imaginative — (adj.) late 14c., ymaginatyf, from O.Fr. imaginatif and directly from M.L. imaginativus, from imaginat , stem of L. imaginari (see IMAGINE (Cf. imagine)). Related: Imaginatively; imaginativeness …   Etymology dictionary

  • imaginative — [adj] creative, inventive artistic, avant garde, blue sky*, brain wave, breaking ground, clever, dreamy, enterprising, extravagant, fanciful, fantastic, fertile, fictive, highflown*, ingenious, inspired, offbeat, original, originative, pie in the …   New thesaurus

  • imaginative — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ having or showing creativity or inventiveness. DERIVATIVES imaginatively adverb imaginativeness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • imaginative — i|mag|i|na|tive [ ı mædʒınətıv ] adjective * 1. ) involving new, different, or exciting ideas: CREATIVE: the imaginative use of computers in the classroom problems that may require more imaginative solutions very/highly imaginative: They… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • imaginative */ — UK [ɪˈmædʒɪnətɪv] / US adjective 1) a) involving new, different, or exciting ideas the imaginative use of computers in the classroom problems that may require more imaginative solutions very/highly imaginative: They suggested some very… …   English dictionary

  • imaginative — adjective 1 someone who is imaginative is good at thinking of new, interesting ideas, and at forming pictures in their mind: an imaginative child 2 something that is imaginative contains new and interesting ideas used in a clever way: imaginative …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • imaginative — i|ma|gi|na|tive [ıˈmædʒınətıv] adj 1.) containing new and interesting ideas ▪ an imaginative use of computer technology ▪ children s imaginative play ▪ an imaginative solution to the litter problem 2.) good at thinking of new and interesting… …   Dictionary of contemporary English